PEW Public Safety Performance Project (PSPP)

Pew’s Public Safety Performance Project (PSPP) works with states to advance data-driven,
fiscally sound policies and practices in the criminal and juvenile justice systems that protect
public safety, hold youth accountable, and keep families together.

 

 

South Dakota

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West Virginia

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Georgia

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Hawaii

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Kentucky

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Utah

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Kansas

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Tennessee

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Research Publications

 

https://www.urban.org/research/publication/state-led-juvenile-justice-systems-improvementRe-Examining Juvenile Incarceration: This report includes findings from a growing body of research, which shows lengthy out-of-home placements in secure corrections or other residential facilities fail to produce better outcomes than alternative sanctions for many juvenile offenders.

Public Opinion on Juvenile Justice in America: This brief analyzes the findings of a nationwide poll conducted in 2014 by a bipartisan team of pollsters, the Mellman Group and Public Opinion Strategies. Most notably, the poll found that U.S. voters support sending serious juvenile offenders to corrections facilities, but they favor a range of less-costly alternatives for lower-level offenders.

Judging for Juvenile Justice: This Q&A asks judges in three states – Georgia, Hawaii, and Kentucky – what prompted them to engage in juvenile justice reform in their states.

Measuring Juvenile Recidivism: This interactive tool summarizes how juvenile corrections agencies define, measure and report on juvenile recidivism, helping policymakers identify gaps in their states’ available data and establish the reduction of recidivism as a key performance goal of their juvenile justice systems.

Examining National and State trends: This project update, using data from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP), shows that between 1997 and 2011 the juvenile commitment rate fell in all but four states and the District of Columbia with an overall national decrease of 48 percent.

Highlighting State Reforms: These briefs highlight state level reforms in Georgia, Hawaii, Kentucky, Ohio, and Texas that reduced the number of juveniles in secure state facilities, while also reducing recidivism, protecting public safety, and containing correctional costs.

See the Urban Institute’s summary of reform in 7 states